REVIEW: ‘No oomph behind the comedy’ ★★ Legally Blonde, New Wimbledon Theatre

There’s something so joyful about American teen musicals. And with the huge success of Mean Girls on Broadway and Heathers here in London, the fun & frothy musicals with a strong female protagonist at their centre are back with a bang.

But there’s one that helped to forge the genre forward when it first hit the stage back in 2007 and that’s Legally Blonde. The musical, based on the novel and 2001 film, became both a cult and commercial success and has continued to enthrall audiences on the amateur circuit. But there was still a hunger for another professional production, and with the UK tour in full flight and conveniently landing in Wimbledon, I thought I’d see if this hilarious girly musical still had what it takes to stand up with the new pretenders.

But unfortunately, with this production at least, Legally Blonde just isn’t in the same league.

The music, by Laurence O’Keefe, who also composed the score for Heathers, is catchy and lyrically hilarious, but there’s just no oomph behind the comedy in this production and the action feels far too slow and lazy. The cast are of a decent standard and Lucie Jones as the heroine Elle Woods is vocally superb, but without the pacy comedy aspect fully explored, it all feels too forced.

And the set design is of such a poor standard, you would be forgiven for thinking you are at a village panto; it’s all badly painted backdrops and clunky set pieces which further slows the pace.

Perhaps if you don’t know the show and are looking on this production with fresh eyes you will be mildly impressed, but I was just left with a feeling of disappointment.

Legally Blonde is at the New Wimbledon Theatre until 23 June.

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REVIEW: ‘An absolute masterwork of drama’ ★★★★★ Pressure, Ambassadors Theatre

Now look, I’m going to be honest and tell you that when I first heard the concept for David Haig’s new West End play Pressure, it didn’t immediately grasp me. An adaptation of a true story about a weatherman in world war two didn’t sound like the type of thing that would get my stagey juices flowing.

But I’m happy to admit I was wrong. Haig’s play is an absolute masterwork of drama, with lovable characters, humour, and a really heart-warming storyline running throughout.

Set just before the D-day landings, we are flung into the planning centre for the invasions, which it is hoped will end World War II. The only problem is that the British weather, as usual is so unpredictable, it could be the difference between success and failure and the lives of thousands of service personnel.

So, General Eisenhower (played with absolute aplomb by Malcolm Sinclair) enlists a weather expert in the shape of Group Captain James Stagg, played by Haig; an intense, somewhat gruff perfectionists, who is determined that his theories are correct. They are assisted by general dogs body, but all-round wonder woman Kay Summersby, played by Laura Rogers, who as well as being a dab hand as a mechanic, provides succour for Eisenhour in an electric relationship. Rogers is a bit of a scene-stealer at times, so good is her portrayal of this strong woman, who yearns for the affection of her superior.

The story really is absolutely fascinating and I found myself gripped from beginning to end. Couple that with some outstanding writing by Haig, which brings out every ounce of humour and some truly stunning performances from the lead cast and you’ve got a winner with this one. Highly recommended.

Pressure is running at the Ambassadors Theatre until 1 September.